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Free magnetic field simulation software

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Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:24 pm PostPost subject: Free magnetic field simulation software
avid_engineer
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Heres a link for anyone wanting to learn a little about magnetic fields and how they interact with various materials.

http://www.ansoft.com/maxwellsv/

Not the best software i've ever used, but its free (!!) and serves a purpose. However, Steorn do claim that their device's results cannot be simulated with some of the most advanced modelling software available so i wouldnt expect too much Smile

Here are some shots of simulations i ran with neodymium permanent magnet sources and nickel shielding. I was testing different materials shortly after reading Steorns LEMA patent.



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Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:32 pm PostPost subject:
WhiteLite
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Wow, very good link! I'll have a play at that.
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Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:37 pm PostPost subject:
avid_engineer
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Hehe, i was excited too when i found it. Its not very straight forward to use though, at least thats what i found. So heres a beginners guide to get you going quickly...

http://my.execpc.com/~rhoadley/basic_user_manual.pdf
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Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:44 pm PostPost subject:
breeze
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AE.

I have way too many programs on the go to try another Wink, but would you be willing to similate another shielding material ?

Does the software have a comprehensive list of materials to choose from ?
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Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:47 pm PostPost subject:
avid_engineer
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It does indeed have a relatively large list to choose from. I dont have it installed right now, but i dont mind having a play with it tomorrow or over the weekend.

What did you have in mind?

BTW. The diagrams i posted illustrate shielding materials 1mm thick, just to give you an idea of scale.
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Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:52 pm PostPost subject:
breeze
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Thanks AE.
Well if you have the time then, I have been considering testing myself( not enough hours in the day) "Bismuth". See Specs below.


1/4 dia X 1/2 long Neodymium-Iron-Boron (NdFeB) Grade N40
with a bismuth shield of 1/16 wall to start.

I owe you one after this.
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Fri Oct 27, 2006 12:02 am PostPost subject: imtereating
clovis ray20
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here is a site i thought was interesting





http://www.wondermagnet.com/magfaq.html
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Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:20 pm PostPost subject:
Frank
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Quote:
Steorn do claim that their device's results cannot be simulated with some of the most advanced modelling software available so i wouldnt expect too much


This is because the "most advanced modelling software" assumes symmetry.

What is needed is software that give an asymmetrical flow between the source and the sink, the source pole and the sink pole.

One needs to write a program where the constants for the inverse square laws of the two poles are different. This will introduce the necessary asymmetry into the field patten.

Existing software will just prove that the Steorn can't possibly work. This is because the existing ideas are inadequate. Symmetry may be very desirable in one's paramour but it is a disaster in physics. One needs to think in the asymmetry one finds in heat, the asymmetry on finds in Boyle's law. Increasing the pressure of a gas by 10% is not symmetrical with decreasing the pressure of a gas by 10%
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Fri Oct 27, 2006 10:03 pm PostPost subject:
avid_engineer
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breeze:

I have re-installed the maxwell seoftware and tried to setup a project as you describe. Unfortunately the materials list does not include Bismuth so i am unable to run the solver.

You can however add materials, and as far as i can see all that is required is the materials Relative Permeability. If you can find that out for me, i will run the solver.

All i can say is that from what have read Bismuth has a Rel. Permeability of < 1 and the software seems to predict poor ability for the material to concentrate the magnetic flux. So perhaps diamagnetism is not optimal for shielding.

I am keen to find out how ferrites will perform. They supposedly have Rel. Permeabilities from 50 to 200 but are non-magnetic so might make good sheilding??
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Fri Oct 27, 2006 11:19 pm PostPost subject:
breeze
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Ae, hope this helps.

Materials may be classified magnetically on the basis of their permeabilities. A diamagnetic material has a constant relative permeability slightly less than 1. When a diamagnetic material, such as bismuth, is placed in a magnetic field, the external field is partly expelled, and the magnetic flux density within it is slightly reduced. A paramagnetic material has a constant relative permeability slightly more than 1. When a paramagnetic material, such as platinum, is placed in a magnetic field, it becomes slightly magnetized in the direction of the external field. A ferromagnetic material, such as iron, does not have a constant relative permeability. As the magnetizing field increases, the relative permeability increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. Purified iron and many magnetic alloys have maximum relative permeabilities of 100,000 or more.
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Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:37 am PostPost subject:
avid_engineer
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breeze,

Thanks for the info, my brain is in hoover mode at the moment so its all good Smile

Still, from what i have read and from experimenting with Maxwell SV materials with low permeabilities (< 1) seem to be far worse at shielding or concentrating magnetic flux than say, iron or nickel (ferromagnetics as you say).

Is the software perhaps missing some aspect of simulating diamagnetism?

I was toying with the idea of buying a small ammount of Pyrolytic Graphite for performing a more hands on test. I find it much easier to understand things when i can observe the results first hand and get a feel for the working.

One more thing id like to throw open for any comments... where could i find detailed information like Rel. Permeability for given materials with either fixed ratio's or functions? -- Thanks for any info.
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Tue Dec 26, 2006 5:35 pm PostPost subject: More magnet info - maybe relevant
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Came across this in my searching.
Figure 3 might be specifically relevant to the Steorn effect.

http://www.allegromicro.com/techpub2/dexter/science.htm

What do you think?
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Thu Dec 28, 2006 4:59 am PostPost subject:
Splonk
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I found that link very interesting -- particularly the description of how the domains change during magnetization.

Does anyone know if the existence of magnetic domains is explained by any current theory? If so, are the changes in them also accounted for?
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Sun Dec 27, 2009 9:47 pm PostPost subject: Re: More magnet info - maybe relevant
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GregL wrote:
Came across this in my searching.
Figure 3 might be specifically relevant to the Steorn effect.

http://www.allegromicro.com/techpub2/dexter/science.htm

What do you think?


Looks like it moved: http://www.allegromicro.com/en/products/design/dexter/science.asp
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Mon Dec 28, 2009 2:01 pm PostPost subject:
Trim
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The link appears broken.
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Mon Dec 28, 2009 5:30 pm PostPost subject: Re: More magnet info - maybe relevant
drichardson
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Nope, the link works just fine:

http://www.allegromicro.com/en/products/design/dexter/science.asp
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Thu Jan 07, 2010 1:02 pm PostPost subject:
Trim
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It does now. Thanks
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